Saturday Chores

Today marks the very first time my husband and I have ventured into a gym together. Usually I get my exercise from walking the dog, but given the terrible weather lately that hasn’t been an option. So twenty minutes on the exercise bike it was! If only upright bikes had wider seats; I had to go recumbent, which is not very comfortable either, given the whole legs-constantly-bumping-into-bump thing. The baby was vaguely concerned about the jostling but mostly slept through it, at least.

And now my husband is washing our dog. I love listening to him do this. I love the whole process of bathing the dog, which generally goes like this:

1) Mommybird gathers up Ladybird’s bedding and beloved blue blanket and throws them into the washing machine, thus designating that Sometime Today, the Dog Will Be Clean.
2) Daddybird forgets he is supposed to wash the dog.
3) Mommybird reminds him.
4) Daddybird says, “Laaaaaaaaadybird, do you want to take a bath?” in the most excited tones possible.
5) The dog retreats to her corner of the couch.
6) Daddybird repeats his not-quite-an-invitation.
7) The dog’s ears go back; her tail tucks underneath her; she attempts to disappear into the couch.
8) Daddybird gathers the dog into his arms, still extolling the virtues of bathtime.
9) The dog attempts to escape Daddybird’s arms. Sometimes she is successful, and steps 4-8 repeat themselves.
10) The dog looks longingly at Mommybird, who stalwartly ignores her.
11) Daddybird carries the dog off to the bathroom.
12) Mommybird sits at the computer or in her chair with her book or basically doing anything that isn’t bathing the dog.
13) Mommybird hears, wafting from the guest bathroom, a tireless and sometimes tuneless song about Ladybird being given a bath, and how she is a good girl NO NO NO NO oh what a good girl she is she is such a good girl NO NO NOT YET oh what a pretty girl she is.
14) The faucet is turned off and Mommybird is treated to an encore performance of “what a good girl she is.”
15) Daddybird announces, “Crazy dog!” and a split second behind the announcement the dog comes careening through the house, heedlessly bouncing off furniture and walls, trying to find a safe place amidst the cruel, cruel sight of her pack alphas.

She’s outside now to dry, which she is less than pleased about, but on the other hand it’s sunny and she loves the sun. I’m sure she’s only clawing at the door because she thinks it sounds cool.

Bathtime with the baby is going to be so much fun.

Advertisements
Categories: family, random thoughts | Tags: , , | 1 Comment

The Church Militant

We’ve found our parish, our lovely on-post chapel, and I will fully admit that one of the things drawing us to it is one of the chaplains (there are three–three!–though one is currently deployed but will probably be coming back in a month or so), as he is an excellent homilist and I do so love a good homily.

So of course his homily today (the readings for your benefit) made, among others, the very real and salient point that Catholic liturgy is not centered around how it makes us feel or how we want it to make us feel or on ticking off a list of things that seem cool or relevant–it is ultimately centered around Christ, in the Eucharist, and our need to commune with him in order to receive the grace necessary to make it through this life[1]. In today’s Gospel, he pointed out, everyone goes to Peter’s house because that’s where Jesus is, and there, Jesus heals. And so we go to Mass, even when we are feeling like Job, because God wants us to keep talking to Him and to keep coming so that He may work his healing in us, even if we are having difficulty seeing it.

He compared it to going to school, where you might like recess but not the actual learning portions, or to being in the Army, where there is always something to complain about, despite the positive notes. But he also pointed out that these are all things we do in community, that we have classmates and spouses and battle buddies to uplift and support us (to be Paul in his second reading, as we are called to preach the Gospel to each other)–and then, this being a military chapel, he reminded us that we are engaged in spiritual warfare, that we are under attack and need the support of our battle buddies, the communication from our commander, and that also we need to be aware that the little it may feel like we’re accomplishing is part of the much bigger, longer fight that we will eventually win–though that victory, like Job’s reward, doesn’t come until the end, until we’ve passed through all the trials. And the Church is the Body of which we are all members, the army to which we all belong, and those rules and rituals she provides for us come from Him Who is her Head. And so we come to a Mass which was given to us on Christ’s terms, not perhaps the ones we would like for him to maybe set forth because they’d be easier or more accessible or entertaining or immediately emotionally gratifying.[2]
Continue reading

Categories: army life, theology | Tags: , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Friday Link Spam

I have an hour and a half left in the day and it has recently come to my attention that I need to write a blog post on a very serious topic, but this week has been a tired week (I am very bad at letting myself rest when I think I should be awake) and so here is another roundup of things I read this week that I think you will like.

POSTS ABOUT BABY/FAMILY-RELATED THINGS
It’s probably not something I’m going to have to worry about, but here’s five reasons not to visit a new mom in the hospital.

Instead of reading various child-raising books, try a more anthropological approach.

I almost always enjoy the posts over at Like Mother, Like Daughter, and Auntie Leila’s advice to the embarrassed mother of a four-year-old is no different. (The comment she mentions about daycare in Europe is I believe this one, though all the comments are good.)

POSTS ABOUT RELIGION AND CULTURE
A brief but excellent reflection on keeping American Sniper in perspective.

An absolutely fabulous reflection on the reception of the Eucharist and how we ought to perceive it (i.e., as none of our business). (I recommend that entire blog.)

A friend of mine wrote a beautiful and true post about the impact books can have on our lives. (Disclaimer: I am the friend in Alabama, and I also mourn the friend we lost.) (A post for another day.) (And actually, a post on that series is already in the works. But it is full of spoilers, so please–just go pick up The Thief and start from there.)

FINALLY, POSTS TO MAKE YOU LAUGH
In case you missed it, AFRICOM general killed in freak wildebeest stampede.

An embarrassing poop story from someone else’s preggo land.

Have a good weekend!

Categories: Friday Link Spam | Tags: , , , , | 1 Comment

FRIDAY LINK SPAM RETURNS

This week was derailed by my husband having a root canal done (and handling it better than really anyone has a right to, I think, though I am very grateful that he’s doing so well), and so in lieu of a second post (which let’s be honest would probably still have been about potage, as I made a triple batch yesterday in order to get us through Soft Diet Only week), here is a small collection of links. Small, but all of the highest caliber.

THINGS TO THINK ABOUT
Hank Green with a brilliant and scathing analysis of how and why the mainstream media has lost millenials.

An outline of seven steps towards achieving financial stability despite a variable income.

A retired Army general in favor of making a year of service more available, if not straight-up mandatory? Yes please.

A brief reflection on suffering and death, or, why we don’t euthanize people.

An article that summarizes key differences between Christianity and Islam, with the aim of arguing that the latter is more violent than the former. On the one hand, it’s a nice narrative; on the other, I feel sure there are some gaps, but don’t know enough to say one way or another.

An excellent breakdown of allegedly gendered things you can do and still be a feminist.

THINGS TO ENJOY
My friend Katherine has turned her blog into a let’s-make-period-recipes-as-close-to-the-original-as-possible blog, and it looks like it should be a lot of fun.

A helpful illustrated guide of 27 things you should never do to a baby.

And finally, Two minutes of babies going through tunnels and freaking the crap out.

See y’all next week!

Categories: Friday Link Spam | Tags: , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

J’aime bien le potage

This is not a food blog, but.

I studied abroad in Angers, France, the fall semester of my junior year of college. The classes generally weren’t too hard, which was nice, and I lived with a host family, which made community-craving me very happy. My host parents and their youngest daughter (about a senior in high school) were absolutely lovely and helped ease some of the homesickness that inevitably comes from being far away from friends and family, especially in a foreign culture. Granted, it was a foreign culture I generally loved, but when you’re mostly on your own for meals sometimes you just want to be able to go to the grocery store after 2000.

And sometimes you’re not able to, and your host mom graciously shares her potage with you.
Continue reading

Categories: food | Tags: , , , , | 2 Comments

Hannah and Eli

When I was a kid, we had a book on tape (complete with finger puppets) about the story of Samuel (1 Samuel 1-3), starting with Hannah’s prayer and ending with his calling. We listened to it many, many, many times, and I can still hear the narrator’s soothing voice, the deep call of “Samuel! Samuel!” It’s always been one of my favorite stories, in part because it is a story, a narrative with dialogue and everything, and in it we hear very human reactions to the trials of life and to God’s call in the midst of them. And we hear people answering that call, making that choice and understanding it means both joy and sorrow, humility and greatness.
Continue reading

Categories: family, Scripture | Tags: , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Hearing and Answering

Sunday morning I was all ready to make a post talking about how since the new translation I’ve noticed a trend in churches to just do whatever psalm setting is in the missalette for the day rather than incorporating the wide variety of psalm settings available, but then I went to Mass and lo and behold they did Rory Cooney’s setting of Psalm 40, which happens to be exactly the psalm and setting we used at our wedding, so! I tried to find you a version to listen to, but as is so often the case with church music finding a recording that matches what you actually hear at Mass (as opposed to a talented-if-sometimes-trying-too-hard soloist with a backup band) is downright impossible, ESPECIALLY if you’re also looking for one that actually has the harmony parts. (It’s four-part. It’s gorgeous. It’s not on Youtube. I looked.)

Anyway.

Recently, Meg over at Pierced Hands confirmed something I was aware of but had never articulated: on Sunday, while the first reading and the Gospel almost always correspond, the second reading follows its own track. This caused me no little amount of grief as a teen lector, when I would spend hours practicing to proclaim the epistle only to have it ignored in the homily because it didn’t quite fit with the other themes. This past Sunday’s readings followed the same pattern, but all the homilies I saw floating around focused on the second reading, the “Don’t you know your body is a temple of the Holy Spirit?” one. Which, I mean, okay, March for Life is this week, it’s an important message anyway, that’s fine. So today I wanted to talk a little bit about the other two readings.
Continue reading

Categories: Scripture, theology | Tags: , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

Finding a Parish

Part of “being military,” or at least being part of a marriage whose employment rests on transience, is learning to settle yourself in a new place as quickly as possible. You get a good head for how to adapt your furniture to your new rooms so that you can start unpacking right away; you have a couple of boxes of those little trinkets that are yours, and you set them up and hang up a few pictures so that the walls are a little more your house and instead of new house. You spend hours digging through boxes labeled “kitchen” and cram as much into the dishwasher at one time as you can so that you can have real plates to eat off, even if the dining room table is still covered in, say, your liquor collection. (We really need to find a place for those, come to think of it.) You make yourself go to the non-mandatory welcome events and pick up all the brochures and calendars (and free swag at the information fairs) and write the more interesting opportunities down on the calendar in an effort to remind you to make the effort to get out and start getting involved.

And, for us at least, you try to find a church.
Continue reading

Categories: army life | Tags: , , , , | Leave a comment

The Dog

This morning I awoke, completed my morning rituals, and yawned my way out to the living room, fully expecting to find my dog sitting on my recliner looking out the window and preparing to scold her profusely for it.

Except she wasn’t on the recliner. Or the couch. Or in her crate.

She was, however, the source of that strange snuffle-lick noise that dogs make when they’re going through your garbage, and there she was in the corner of the kitchen, having accessed the garbage bag inside the garbage closet (apparently the door was not secured last night) and having found, amidst all the other treasures, two Lindt milk chocolate bunnies that we had found while unpacking, gone “how old are these?” and promptly tossed.

(Is there any way to work an Oxford comma into the last bit of that sentence? I don’t think so. Tragic.)
Continue reading

Categories: family | Tags: | Leave a comment

Happy New Year!

It has been not quite a month since my last post, but oh, what a month. It’s funny to think I started this blog off posting about moving things and people, as we’ve just undergone another move in which I tried to be more relaxed about my things and have been rewarded by having some of them go missing. As for people, well, we made good good-byes of it, I think, but my personal tally of people I needed to say goodbye to was…generously, seven or eight. Which is strange, because so much happened while we were at our last post, and yet very little of it happened at that post.
Continue reading

Categories: life happenings | Tags: , , , , , | 2 Comments

Create a free website or blog at WordPress.com.